Storytelling

Storytelling

Did you know that storytelling develops concentration AND offers a strong foundation for literacy?

 Storytelling is a central theme that develops throughout the different stages of the Steiner Waldorf Curriculum. It has multiple applications and impact on learning outcomes for your child.

  • Kindergarten children listen to stories told to them by their teacher, who has learnt the story word for word and repeats it each day for a week. The stories they tell engage the imagination of your child as they immerse themselves in the familiar images shared. Enthralled with the story (and feeling secure in its repetition), children learn to sit quietly and develop concentration.
  • Soon enough, more complicated stories can be told, introducing children to a richer diet of vocabulary and language (this also creates strong foundations for literacy). This is evidenced later, when children start to tell their own stories and write simple tales for themselves.
  • Storytelling is also used at the Greenwich Steiner School, to help address any behavioural issues as they sometimes arise in the early years and up until Class 2 or 3. Smaller children in particular are not always able to control their behaviour. Directly addressing this in them can often bring with it feelings of shame, as well as impacting on self-esteem. However, when these same messages are communicated in a story about an imaginary child or animal exhibiting the same behaviour, children can receive the stories and understand them without shame.
  • Stories can also work this same way if a child is worried about something, for example being estranged from a parent or dealing with the death of a relative.
  • As children progress throughout the school, storytelling naturally leads into History and English Literature and many other subjects, including Geography, Physics and Geometry, amongst others.

When experienced from a young age, storytelling gives your child a love of language, building important foundations for literacy, as well as helping them to develop more sophisticated expressions in all aspects of their learning. This is something that they will carry with them into adulthood.